Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford

Leda Cosmides and John Tooby (Founders of Evolutionary Psychology)

  • Gary L Brase
Living reference work entry

Later version available View entry history

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-16999-6_3582-1

Synonyms

Definition

Cosmides and Tooby, intellectual kindred spirits, have been leaders in both the theoretical and empirical development of modern evolutionary psychology.

Introduction

They have been leading intellectual influences in the field of evolutionary psychology for over 35 years, but it was possible that John Tooby and Leda Cosmides might have never met. Yes, they both attended Harvard University, but Tooby’s undergraduate degree in psychology (1975) was before Cosmides’ graduate work in psychology during the early 1980s. Similarly, Cosmides’ undergraduate degree in biology (1979) only briefly intersected with Tooby’s work in behavioral biology before he moved on to biological anthropology. But then Irven DeVore got involved.

Meet Cute

Starting in 1971 and running for several decades, Irv DeVore (John Tooby’s advisor) held a “Simian Seminar” in the living room of his home. These seminars were incredibly influential due to both the content...

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References

  1. Cosmides, L. (1985). Deduction or Darwinian Algorithms? An explanation of the “elusive” content effect on the Wason selection task. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University. University Microfilms #86-02206.Google Scholar
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  17. Sugiyama, L., Tooby, J., & Cosmides, L. (2002). Cross-cultural evidence of cognitive adaptations for social exchange among the Shiwiar of Ecuadorian Amazonia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99, 11537–11542.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychological SciencesKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Gary L Brase
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychological SciencesKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA