Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

Living Edition
| Editors: Jay Lebow, Anthony Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Scott, Stanley

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-15877-8_766-1
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Name

Scott Stanley

Introduction

Over the course of his career, Scott Stanley, Ph.D. has made numerous contributions to Couple and Family Psychology. Currently, Dr. Stanley is a research professor and co-director of the Center for Marital and Family Studies at the University of Denver. He is most well-known for his scholarly contributions to marital enrichment and relationship education as well as his research and writings on commitment. Additionally, Dr. Stanley has been involved in the research, development, and refinement of the Prevention and Relationship Education Program (PREP) curriculum and has been influential in the research and clinical understanding of how couples form and stay together and the nuances of commitment dynamics.

Career

Dr. Stanley graduated Magna Cum Laude from Bowling Green State University in 1979 with a psychology major and business minor. He then pursued a Master’s of Science in Clinical Psychology from Ohio University. In 1986, Stanley obtained his...

Keywords

National Institute Of Child Health And Human Development (NICHD) Relationship Education Programs Marriage Education Curriculum Relationship Couples Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Key Citations

  1. Markman, H. J., Stanley, S. M., & Blumberg, S. L. (2010). Fighting for your marriage. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  2. Stanley, S. M., Rhoades, G. K., & Markman, H. J. (2006). Sliding vs. deciding: Inertia and the premarital cohabitation effect. Family Relations, 55, 499–509.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Stanley, S. M., Rhoades, G. K., & Whitton, S. W. (2010b). Commitment: Functions, formation, and the securing of romantic attachment. Journal of Family Theory and Review, 2, 243–257.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  4. Stanley, S. M., Rhoades, G. K., Amato, P. R., Markman, H. J., & Johnson, C. A. (2010a). The timing of cohabitation and engagement: Impact on first and second marriages. Journal of Marriage and Family, 72, 906–918.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Stanley, S. M., Rhoades, G. K., Loew, B. A., Allen, E. S., Carter, S., Osborne, L. J., Prentice, D., & Markman, H. J. (2014). A randomized controlled trial of relationship education in the U.S. Army: 2-year outcomes. Family Relations, 63, 482–495.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.William C. Tallent VA Outpatient ClinicKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Health AdministrationSan DiegoUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Heather Pederson
    • 1
  • Diana Semmelhack
    • 2
  1. 1.Council for RelationshipsPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Midwestern UniversityDowners GroveUSA