Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

Living Edition
| Editors: Jay Lebow, Anthony Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Integrative Family Therapy for Difficult Divorce

  • Jay L. Lebow
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-15877-8_708-1

Introduction

Divorce is almost always emotionally challenging. When issues concerning child custody and visitation are added further complications arise. Some families break down in this process. Typically this involves high conflict between parents and sometimes between parents and children and extended family as well. Lower conflict intractable versions of such conflict also fall within this approach. Working with these families can be particularly difficult given the myriad circumstances and issues they bring into therapy. This integrative therapy approach developed by Jay Lebow looks to minimize the difficulties in families identified as having difficulties either in the divorce process or after divorce, most especially around issues concerning the well-being of children and distribution of their time with parents.

Prominent Associated Figures

Jay Lebow developed this treatment approach at the Family Institute at Northwestern. It is influenced by and incorporates many of the tenets...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Farrah Hughes
    • 1
  • Allen Sabey
    • 2
  1. 1.Employee Assistance ProgramMcLeod HealthFlorenceUSA
  2. 2.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA