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Body Movements in Music Performances: The Example of Clarinet Players

  • Manfred Nusseck
  • Marcelo M. Wanderley
  • Claudia Spahn
Reference work entry

Abstract

Musicians move in many ways when performing music. Such movements, or gestures, may have a variety of roles in a performance. They can directly and indirectly control the sound of the instrument and build up communication between performers or between performers and the audience. Although omnipresent in performances, some of these gestures, however, do not seem to have a clear relationship to the process of sound production. In this chapter, general aspects of movements of musicians in music performances, and the distinction of these movements, are introduced and illustrated with an analysis of ancillary movements of clarinet performers.

Keywords

Music performance Musical gestures Ancillary movements Clarinet Motion capture 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The second author would like to thank Bradley Vines and Ioana Dalca for their long-term collaboration, Mauricio Alves Loureiro and Euler Teixeira for several comments and suggestions to this manuscript, as well as the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) for partially funding his research.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manfred Nusseck
    • 1
  • Marcelo M. Wanderley
    • 2
  • Claudia Spahn
    • 1
  1. 1.Freiburg Institute for Musicians’ Medicine, University of Music Freiburg, Medical Center – University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  2. 2.Input Devices and Music Interaction Laboratory (IDMIL), CIRMMTMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

Section editors and affiliations

  • Sebastian I. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.Movement Analysis LaboratoryClinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery; Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury;Heidelberg University HospitalHeidelbergGermany

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