Measuring Household Vulnerability to Climate Change

Reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter summarizes research on the potential impacts of climate change on households, with a particular focus on contributions from different methodological approaches to understanding impacts for households in developing countries. Agriculture has been a central focus of this literature, both because of the sensitivity of the agricultural sector to a changing climate and also because of the importance of agriculture for the livelihoods of the poor. The literature review shows that developing countries are largely expected to be disproportionally hurt by projected changes in temperature, precipitation, and extreme events. On the other hand, the actual household level response to these changes is not well understood, and there are still gaps in the methodological approaches to understanding these issues. The recent literature reveals promising approaches that may complement and improve existing methods as more data becomes available.

Keywords

Climate change Agriculture Sub-Saharan Africa Climate variability Drought Flood Panel data Computable general equilibrium Economy-wide Farm household Crop simulation models Adaptation Vulnerability Shock Risk Smallholder agriculture Food prices Inequality Poverty Adaptation policy Market imperfections Crop productivity 

References

  1. Arndt C, Chinowsky P, Robinson S, Strzepek K, Tarp F, Thurlow J (2012) Economic development under climate change. Rev Develop Econom 16(3):369–377CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Besley T (1995) Chapter 36 Savings, credit and insurance. In: Behrman J, Srinivasan TN (eds) Handbook of development economics, vol 3. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 2123–2207Google Scholar
  3. Binswanger HP, Rosenzweig MR (1986) Behavioural and material determinants of production relations in agriculture. J Develop Stud 22(3):503–539CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bryan E, Deressa TT, Gbetibouo GA, Ringler C (2009) Adaptation to climate change in Ethiopia and South Africa: options and constraints. Environ Sci Policy 12(4):413–426CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Burke M, Emerick K (2013) Adaptation to climate change: evidence from US agriculture. Unpublished, University of California, BerkeleyGoogle Scholar
  6. Burke M, Lobell D (2010) Food security and adaptation to climate change: what do we know? In: Climate change and food security. Springer, Dordrecht, pp 133–153CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Chen S, Ravallion M (2010) The developing world is poorer than we thought, but no less successful in the fight against poverty. Quartr J Econom 125(4):1577–1625CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cline WR (1996) The impact of global warming of agriculture: comment. Am Econom Rev 86:1309–1311Google Scholar
  9. Darwin R (1999) The impact of global warming on agriculture: a Ricardian analysis: comment. Am Econom Rev 89:1049–1052CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Darwin R, Kennedy D (2000) Economic effects of CO2 fertilization of crops: transforming changes in yield into changes in supply. Environ Model Assessment 5(3):157–168CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. de Janvry A, Fafchamps M, Sadoulet E (1991) Peasant household behaviour with missing markets: some paradoxes explained. Econom J 101(409):1400–1417Google Scholar
  12. Dell M, Jones BF, Olken BA (2013) What do we learn from the weather? The New Climate-Economy Literature. J Econom Literature 52(3):740–98Google Scholar
  13. Dercon S (2002) Income risk, coping strategies, and safety nets. World Bank Res Observ 17(2):141–166CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Deressa TT, Hassan RM, Ringler C, Alemu T, Yesuf M (2009) Determinants of farmers’ choice of adaptation methods to climate change in the Nile Basin of Ethiopia. Glob Environ Chang 19(2):248–255CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Di Falco S, Veronesi M (2013) How can African agriculture adapt to climate change? A counterfactual analysis from Ethiopia. Land Econ 89(4):743–766CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Di Falco S, Yesuf M, Kohlin G, Ringler C (2012) Estimating the impact of climate change on agriculture in low-income countries: household level evidence from the Nile Basin, Ethiopia. Environ Res Econom 52(4):457–478CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Easterlin RA (2000) The worldwide standard of living since 1800. J Econom Perspect 14(1):7–26CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Hanemann WM (2000) Adaptation and its measurement. Clim Change 45(3):571–581CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Hertel TW, Rosch SD (2010) Climate change, agriculture, and poverty. Appl Econ Perspect Pol (Autumn 2010) 32(3):355–385Google Scholar
  20. Hertel TW, Burke MB, Lobell DB (2010) The poverty implications of climate-induced crop yield changes by 2030. Glob Environ Chang 20(4):577–585CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. IPCC (2013) Summary for policymakers. In: Stocker T, Qin D, Plattner G-K, Tignor M, Allen S, Boschung J, Nauels A, Xia Y, Bex V, Midgley P (eds) Climate change 2013: the physical science basis. Contribution of working group I to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  22. IPCC (2014) Summary for policymakers. In: Field C, Barros V, Dokken D, Mach K, Mastrandrea M, Bilir T, Chatterjee M, Ebi K, Estrada Y, Genova R, Girma B, Kissel E, Levy A, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea P, White LL (eds) Climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  23. Jones PG, Thornton PK (2003) The potential impacts of climate change on maize production in Africa and Latin America in 2055. Glob Environ Chang 13(1):51–59CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Kurukulasuriya P, Rosenthal S (2003) Climate change and agriculture: a review of impacts and adaptations. World Bank, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  25. Löfgren H, Robinson S (1999) Nonseparable farm household decisions in a computable general equilibrium model. Am J Agric Econom 81(3):663–670CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Mendelsohn R (2008) The impact of climate change on agriculture in developing countries. J Nat Res Policy Res 1(1):5–19CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Mendelsohn R, Dinar A (1999) Climate change, agriculture, and developing countries: does adaptation matter? World Bank Res Observ 14(2):277–293CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Mendelsohn R, Nordhaus WD, Shaw D (1994) The impact of global warming on agriculture: a Ricardian analysis. Am Econom Rev 84(4):753–771Google Scholar
  29. Morton JF (2007) The impact of climate change on smallholder and subsistence agriculture. Proc Natl Acad Sci 104(50):19680–19685CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Nakicenovic N, Swart R (2000) Special report on emissions scenarios. Edited by Nebojsa Nakicenovic and Robert Swart, pp 612. ISBN 0521804930. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, July 2000, p 1Google Scholar
  31. Nelson GC, Rosegrant MW, Koo J, Robertson R, Sulser T, Zhu T, Ringler C, Msangi S, Palazzo A, Batka M et al (2009) Climate change: Impact on agriculture and costs of adaptation. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  32. Niang I, Ruppel O, Abdrabo M, Essel A, Lennard C, Padgham J, Urquhart P (2014) Africa. In: Field C, Barros V, Dokken D, Mach K, Mastrandrea M, Bilir T, Chatterjee M, Ebi K, Estrada Y, Genova R, Girma B, Kissel E, Levy A, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea P, White LL (eds) Climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part B: regional aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  33. Parry M, Rosenzweig C, Iglesias A, Fischer G, Livermore M (1999) Climate change and world food security: a new assessment. Glob Environ Chang 9:S51–S67CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Pauw K, Thurlow J, Bachu M, Van Seventer DE (2011) The economic costs of extreme weather events: a hydrometeorological CGE analysis for Malawi. Environ Develop Econom 16(02):177–198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Porter J, Xie L, Challinor A, Cochrane K, Howden S, Iqbal M, Lobell D, Travasso M (2014) Food security and food production systems. In: Field C, Barros V, Dokken D, Mach K, Mastrandrea M, Bilir T, Chatterjee M, Ebi K, Estrada Y, Genova R, Girma B, Kissel E, Levy A, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea P, White LL (eds) Climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  36. Rosenzweig C, Parry ML (1994) Potential impact of climate change on world food supply. Nature 367(6459):133–138CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Schlenker W, Lobell DB (2010) Robust negative impacts of climate change on African agriculture. Environ Res Lett 5(1):014010CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Schmidhuber J, Tubiello FN (2007) Global food security under climate change. Proc Natl Acad Sci 104(50):19703–19708CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Singh I, Squire L, Strauss J (1986) Agricultural household models: extensions, applications, and policy. Johns Hopkins University Press, BaltimoreGoogle Scholar
  40. Skjeflo S (2013) Measuring household vulnerability to climate change – why markets matter. Glob Environ Chang 23(6):1694–1701CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Skoufias E, Rabassa M, Olivieri S, Brahmbhatt M (2011) The poverty impacts of climate change – a review of the evidence. World Bank Policy Research Paper. World Bank, Washington, DCCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Taraz V (2013) Adaptation to climate change: historical evidence from the Indian monsoon. Department of Economics, Yale University, New HavenGoogle Scholar
  43. Thurlow J, Zhu T, Diao X (2012) Current climate variability and future climate change: estimated growth and poverty impacts for Zambia. Rev Develop Econom 16(3):394–411CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Wooldridge JM (2010) Econometric analysis of cross section and panel data. MIT Press, Cambridge, MAMATHGoogle Scholar
  45. World Bank (2014) World development indicators 2014. http://www.scribd.com/doc/222646575/World-Development-Indicators-2014. Accessed 26 Aug 2014

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UMB School of Economics and BusinessNorwegian University of Life SciencesÅsNorway

Personalised recommendations