Encyclopedia of Computer Graphics and Games

Living Edition
| Editors: Newton Lee

Contemporary Computer Shogi

  • Takenobu Takizawa
  • Takeshi Ito
  • Takuya Hiraoka
  • Kunihito Hoki
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-08234-9_22-1

Synonyms

Definition

Computer shogi is a field of artificial intelligence involving the creation of software programs capable of playing shogi, the Japanese form of chess.

Introduction

Computer shogi was first developed in late 1974 by Takenobu Takizawa and his research group. It has been steadily improved by researchers and commercial programmers using game tree making and pruning methods, opening and middle game databases, and feedback from research into tsume-shogi (mating) problems. The strength of computer shogi has been measured by watching and studying many games between computer programs and professional players and has reached that of top-level human players. In the remainder of the article, section “Computer-Computer Games” describes the history of computer-computer games. Section “Computer Shogi Players” describes the programs that played them, and section “Computer-Human Games” describes the history of human-computer games.

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References and Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takenobu Takizawa
    • 1
  • Takeshi Ito
    • 2
  • Takuya Hiraoka
    • 3
  • Kunihito Hoki
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Political Science and EconomicsWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Communication Engineering and InformaticsThe University of Electro-CommunicationsChofuJapan
  3. 3.HEROZ, Inc.OsakaJapan