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Assistive Technology in Education

  • Francis QuekEmail author
  • Yasmine El-glaly
  • Francisco Oliveira
Reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter overviews the state of research in assistive technologies that support teaching and learning for individuals with blindness or severe visual impairment (IBSVI). Education, learning, and information are culturally defined and designed for efficient communication and access for humans with typical visual and spatial capabilities. Understanding the unintended roadblocks to IBSVI brought on by such culturally defined elements of instruction and information is critical to assisting IBSVI to participate in the education and learning milieux. We divide the assistive technology challenges to the support for classroom instruction and for individual access to informational media. We address different aspects of each of these challenges and discuss various approaches to these aspects.

Keywords

Blindness Embodiment Learning Reading Assistive technology Visual impairment Human-computer interaction Discourse support Gestures Pointing 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francis Quek
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yasmine El-glaly
    • 2
    • 3
  • Francisco Oliveira
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of VisualizationTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Faculty of SciencePort Said UniversityPort SaidEgypt
  3. 3.College of Computers and Information TechnologyTaif UniversityTaifSaudi Arabia
  4. 4.Ceara State UniversityFortalezaBrazil

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