Reference Work Entry

Optical Coherence Tomography

pp 1007-1054

Optical Coherence Elastography

  • Brendan F. KennedyAffiliated withOptical+Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia Email author 
  • , Kelsey M. KennedyAffiliated withOptical+Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia
  • , Amy L. OldenburgAffiliated withDepartment of Physics and Astronomy and the Biomedical Research Imaging Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • , Steven G. AdieAffiliated withDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University
  • , Stephen A. BoppartAffiliated withBiophotonics Imaging Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignDepartments of Bioengineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • , David D. SampsonAffiliated withOptical+Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western AustraliaCentre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, The University of Western Australia

Abstract

The mechanical properties of tissue are pivotal in its function and behavior, and are often modified by disease. From the nano- to the macro-scale, many tools have been developed to measure tissue mechanical properties, both to understand the contribution of mechanics in the origin of disease and to improve diagnosis. Optical coherence elastography is applicable to the intermediate scale, between that of cells and whole organs, which is critical in the progression of many diseases and not widely studied to date. In optical coherence elastography, a mechanical load is imparted to a tissue and the resulting deformation is measured using optical coherence tomography. The deformation is used to deduce a mechanical parameter, e.g., Young’s modulus, which is mapped into an image, known as an elastogram. In this chapter, we review the development of optical coherence elastography and report on the latest developments. We provide a focus on the underlying principles and assumptions, techniques to measure deformation, loading mechanisms, imaging probes and modeling, including the inverse elasticity problem.

Keywords

Elastography Optical elastography Tissue mechanics Biomechanics Cell mechanics Soft tissue