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Welfare in a Competitive European Union? Some Aspects of Cybernetic Higher Education (HE) Policy in Knowledge Generation

  • Kajetan Stransky-Can
Living reference work entry

Abstract

In Neoclassic Economic Growth Theory, economic growth (g) is co-determined by (investment into) Research and Development (R&D). Considering the background of a simple production function of the European companies including R&D as an enhancing factor of capital and labor, the European Union (EU) is seen as a region where this causality is relatively strong in comparison to regions where the effects of g are predominantly determining resource flows into R&D. This analysis attempts to discuss Higher Education (HE) Policy – facilitators for investments into R&D (the view of Growth Theory) and examples of this kind of investment into basic and applied research in Austria. Another example of an established facilitator for investments into R&D is the knowledge transfer from (the escalation of) national HE Policy programs to a supranational level (e.g., the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation). We also take a look at the feedback from g on resource flows into R&D (the view of Knowledge State Theory), since especially basic research funding is expected to be predominantly input-based (i.e., government expenditure stocks are path dependent and changes in expenditure stocks depend on g through overall government revenue). This feedback-loop is considered as a main element of Cybernetic HE Policy. However, it is clear that g is a much larger aggregate of processes than public, private, or public–private-partnership (PPP) R&D. As a last step, findings from an analysis of consequences of (PPP-induced) quality management in Austrian HE institutions for the academic profession will be reflected on grounds of the findings about aspects in Organizational Sociology and EU – member state observations.

Keywords

Knowledge state Research and development (R&D) Basic research Applied research European Union Austria Supranational politics Knowledge democracy State funding Higher education policy National politics 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bundesministerium für Wissenschaft, Forschung und WirtschaftViennaAustria

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