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Discourse Communities: From Origins to Social Media

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Discourse and Education

Part of the book series: Encyclopedia of Language and Education ((ELE))

Abstract

Discourse communities, their characteristic features and communicative routines, have long been a focus of research. The expansion of technology has changed discourse communities, however, because a much broader set of members can now participate in them. Contemporary research has begun to explore how technology-mediated discourse communities form and change, as well as how they serve educational and other social functions. In this chapter, we review research on discourse communities, focusing on the various changes that mediated online environments such as social media have brought to contemporary discourse communities. We also describe advances in and the challenges of conducting research on discourse communities established through social media.

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Correspondence to Deoksoon Kim or Oksana Vorobel .

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Kim, D., Vorobel, O. (2015). Discourse Communities: From Origins to Social Media. In: Wortham, S., Kim, D., May, S. (eds) Discourse and Education. Encyclopedia of Language and Education. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-02322-9_33-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-02322-9_33-1

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