Skip to main content

Political Toleration as Substantive Neutrality

  • 257 Accesses

Abstract

The nature and scope of political toleration is a matter of much controversy within liberal democratic politics. This chapter suggests that toleration itself should be understood as emerging from the practice of adjudicating likely irreconcilable goods with an eye toward individual agency. Further, it shows that political toleration is best understood as what a number of scholars have described as “substantive neutrality,” where the liberal state aspires to remain neutral among different ways of life and is committed to redressing inequities arising from that effort to remain neutral.

Keywords

  • Toleration
  • Liberalism
  • Democracy
  • Pluralism
  • Neutrality
  • Recognition
  • Autonomy
  • Freedom

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-42121-2_42
  • Chapter length: 15 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   549.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-42121-2
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   599.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

References

  • Bowlin, John R (2016) Tolerance among the Virtues. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Eberle, CJ (2002) “Religion and liberal democracy.” In The Blackwell Guide to Social and Political Philosophy, edited by R.L. Simon. New York: Blackwell

    Google Scholar 

  • Forst, Rainer (2014) “Toleration and Democracy.” Journal of Social Philosophy 45(1):65–75

    Google Scholar 

  • Galeotti, AE (2002) Toleration as Recognition. New York: Cambridge University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Gill ER (2001) Becoming Free: Autonomy and Diversity in the Liberal Polity. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas

    Google Scholar 

  • Halbertal M (1996) “Autonomy, Toleration, and Group Rights.” In Toleration : An Elusive Virtue, edited by D. Heyd, 242. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Hamburger J (1999) John Stuart Mill On Liberty and Control. Princeton: Princeton University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Hauerwas S (1981) A Community of Character: Toward a Constructive Christian Social Ethic. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Heyd D (2008) “Is Toleration A Political Virtue?” In Toleration and Its Limits, edited by M. Williams, 171–94. New York: New York University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • King PT (1998) Toleration. London: Frank Cass

    Google Scholar 

  • Koppelman, Andrew (2004) “The Fluidity of Neutrality.” Review of Politics 66(4):633–48

    Google Scholar 

  • ——. (2013) Defending American Religious Neutrality. Harvard University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Larmore CE (1987) Patterns of Moral Complexity. New York: Cambridge University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Laycock D (1990) “Formal, Substantive, and Disaggregated Neutrality Toward Religion.” Depaul Law Review 39:993–1018

    Google Scholar 

  • MacIntyre AC (1980) After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press

    Google Scholar 

  • McConnell MW (2000) “Believers as Equal Citizens.” In Obligations of Citizenship and Demands of Faith, edited by N.L. Rosenblum. Princeton: Princeton University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • McGraw BT (2010) Faith in Politics: Religion and Liberal Democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Mendus S (1999) The Politics of Toleration : Tolerance and Intolerance in Modern Life. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Monsma S (2000) “Substantive Neutrality as a Basis for Free Exercise-No Establishment Common Ground.” Journal of Church and State 42(1):13–35

    Google Scholar 

  • Oberdiek H (2001) Tolerance: Between Forbearance and Acceptance. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

    Google Scholar 

  • Rawls John (1996) Political Liberalism. New York: Columbia University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Rosenblum NL (1998) Membership and Morals: The Personal Uses of Pluralism in America. Princeton: Princeton University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Sher, G. 1997. Beyond Neutrality : Perfectionism and Politics. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, Steven (2010) The Disenchantment of Secular Discourse. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Stepan A (2000) “Religion, Democracy, and the ‘Twin Tolerations.’ ” Journal of Democracy 11(4):37–58

    Google Scholar 

  • Taylor C and A Gutmann (1992) Multiculturalism and “The Politics of Recognition” : An Essay. Princeton: Princeton University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Tomasi J (2001) Liberalism Beyond Justice. Princeton: Princeton University Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Williams B (1999) “Tolerating the Intolerable.” In The Politics of Toleration: Tolerance and Intolerance in Modern Life, edited by S. Mendus. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Bryan T. McGraw .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Section Editor information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this entry

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this entry

McGraw, B.T. (2022). Political Toleration as Substantive Neutrality. In: Sardoč, M. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Toleration. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-42121-2_42

Download citation