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COVID-19 Restrictions-Related Mental Health Challenges and Associated Public Health Preventive Strategies Via a Critical Evolutionary Mismatch Perspective

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Definition

The disturbingly extensive spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is currently a grave cause for global concern. (Re-)enforcing/advocating social and movement restrictions are part of the core repertoire of tactics numerous countries have adopted in dealing with this pandemic. While arguably essential courses of action, prolonged restriction measures could nevertheless cause individuals to be excessively exposed to a host of evolutionarily unnatural conditions that might render them more susceptible to experiencing psychological problems. A selection of key public health preventive strategies, founded on the framework of evolutionary mismatch (which can be arguably regarded as a form of critical approach as well), including (1) the facilitation of technology use to maintain social contact with kin and close friends; (2) encouraging the enhancement of natural stimuli in people’s homes; (3) curtailing individuals’ exposure to overwhelming amount of COVID-19...

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Movement restrictions
  • Mental health
  • Public health strategies
  • Evolutionary mismatch

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Correspondence to Jiaqing O .

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O, J., Chang, L. (2021). COVID-19 Restrictions-Related Mental Health Challenges and Associated Public Health Preventive Strategies Via a Critical Evolutionary Mismatch Perspective. In: Lester, J.N., O'Reilly, M. (eds) The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Critical Perspectives on Mental Health. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-12852-4_96-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-12852-4_96-1

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  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-12852-4

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