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Disability

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Definition

Disability scholars and theorists have proposed models of disability that contribute to mainstream understandings of what disability is and how it operates as a state of being and identity. In this entry, we address the medical model of disability (e.g., Fisher and Goodley 2007), social model of disability (e.g., Shakespeare 2006), and relational model of disability (e.g., Reindal 2009). Worth noting, but not addressed in this entry, theoretical models of disability are evolving: some of these evolutions include the human rights model of disability and the capability approach model (see Degener 2017).

Introduction

It’s early morning; 26 kindergarteners enter their classroom in a quiet line. Their teacher, Ms. Wilson, has reset the classroom’s behavior card chart, prominently displayed at the front of the room. Every child begins the day with a green card next to their name: a mark of good behavior. Tyler, one of the few Black boys in the class, looks at the behavior cards...

Keywords

  • Critical childhood studies
  • Disability studies
  • Discourse
  • Relational pedagogies

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Correspondence to M. Nickie Coomer , Margaret R. Beneke or Carlyn Mueller .

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Coomer, M.N., Beneke, M.R., Mueller, C. (2021). Disability. In: Lester, J.N., O'Reilly, M. (eds) The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Critical Perspectives on Mental Health. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-12852-4_81-1

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