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Addiction and Recovery as Social Practice

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Abstract

The current dominant model for understanding and treating addiction and recovery utilizes a brain disease etiology, with little focus on the individual person, context, material, relationships, and everyday lives in which addiction and recovery are enacted. This entry problematizes the brain disease model and offers a new way of viewing addiction and recovery. A social practice model frames addiction and recovery as discursive practices that are reproduced and relationally grounded in materials and relationships in everyday life.

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Recovery
  • Social practice
  • Relational practice
  • Discourse

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Mudry, T. (2021). Addiction and Recovery as Social Practice. In: Lester, J.N., O'Reilly, M. (eds) The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Critical Perspectives on Mental Health. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-12852-4_38-1

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