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Statehood Conflicts

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The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Peace and Conflict Studies

Synonyms

Conflicts of de facto states; Conflicts of unrecognized states; Secessionist conflicts; Separatist conflicts; Sovereignty conflicts; Territorial conflicts

Definition/Description

Statehood conflicts are those emanating from incompatible claims to and substantial efforts at statehood over the same territory. The main parts to the conflict are the different claimants to statehood, often but not always a recognized state and a group that is seeking secession from it. A variety of other regional or global actors, like states or international organizations, are also involved to a greater or lesser degree. While often defined by intractability, typical solutions of such conflicts include forceful or peaceful (re)integration to the state from which secession is attempted or, more rarely, independent statehood.

Introduction

The process of state creation lies at the heart of the modern international system. It is also most often a violent process with secession, the default way in which...

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Correspondence to George Kyris .

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Kyris, G. (2020). Statehood Conflicts. In: The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Peace and Conflict Studies. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11795-5_154-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11795-5_154-1

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