Nuclear Energy pp 309-340 | Cite as

Radiation Sources

Reference work entry
Part of the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology Series book series (ESSTS)

Glossary

Absorbed dose

A general term for the energy transferred from radiation to matter. Specifically, the absorbed dose is the amount of energy absorbed in a unit mass of matter from ionizing radiation. Units are the gray (Gy) and rad, respectively, equivalent to 1 J/kg and 100 ergs/g. Thus, 1 Gy equals 100 rad.

Activity

The decay rate (expected number of nuclear transformations per unit time) in a radioactive sample. Units are the becquerel (Bq) equal to one decay per second, and the curie (Ci) equal to 3.7 × 1010 decays per second.

Alpha particle

The nucleus of a 4He atom, composed of two neutrons and two protons and denoted by α.

Committed dose

The dose equivalent accumulated over the rest of a person’s life following the ingestion or inhalation of radioactive material into the body.

Coulomb force

The electrostatic force between two charges. It is proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. The force is...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Nuclear EngineeringKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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