Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

Living Edition
| Editors: Robert A. Meyers

Sustainable Productivity, Heat Tolerance for

  • Anthony E. Hall
Living reference work entry

Later version available View entry history

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2493-6_158-3

Definition of the Subject and Its Importance

As a consequence of global climate change, air temperatures are predicted to increase by about 4 °C during the twenty-first century. Plant physiological and developmental processes respond to temperature by increasing at low temperatures, responding only slightly at optimum temperatures and decreasing at high temperatures. At high temperatures, the processes can become irreversibly damaged. Of particular concern for crop production are the substantial decreases in grain or fruit production caused by experimentally induced increases in air temperature that have been observed in field conditions. In addition, in some zones and years, some crop species already are being subjected to temperatures that are above optimal. In a small number of cases, crop cultivars have been bred with developmental and physiological processes that can tolerate a few degrees higher temperature, such that they are heat resistant and produce more economic yield than...

Keywords

Heat Stress Heat Tolerance Reproductive Development Subtropical Zone Spikelet Fertility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Bibliography

Primary Literature

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Further Reading

  1. Hall AE (2000) Heat stress section in www.plantstress.com

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Botany and Plant SciencesUniversity of California RiversideQuincyUSA