High-Relief Ridge

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9213-9_185-1

Definition

Narrow, linear to arcuate feature in plain view that occurs on silicate bodies (e.g., Mars, Mercury) thought to have experienced local-, regional-, or global-scale contraction. High-relief ridges are likely a morphological variant of lobate scarps, which are interpreted to be the surface expressions of reverse faulting.

Synonyms

Description

Up to hundreds of kilometers long, are positive-relief landforms that deform surface units as well as the walls and floors of impact craters (Watters et al. 2009 and references therein). Rare in comparison with lobate scarps, high-relief ridges often show a transition with them (Fig. 1), suggesting that high-relief ridges and lobate scarps are similar expressions of the same process (Head et al. 2007; Watters et al. 2009; Watters and Nimmo 2010; Byrne et al. 2014).

Keywords

Reverse Fault Planetary Body Mare Basalt Linear Ridge Dike Intrusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dipartimento di Geoscienze and CISASUniversità degli Studi di PadovaPadovaItaly
  2. 2.Lunar and Planetary InstituteUniversities Space Research AssociationHoustonUSA