Blowout Dune and Hollow

  • Rita González-VillanuevaEmail author
  • Henrik Hargitai
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9213-9_18-2

Definition

A blowout is a depression or hollow formed by wind erosion on a preexisting sand deposit, formed together with an adjoining sand accumulation (depositional lobe, blowout dune, or garmada) for which sand is derived from the depression or other sources (Glenn 1979; Hesp 2002).

Synonyms

Description

The blowout is a saucer cup- or trough-shaped hollow formed by wind erosion on a preexisting sand deposit. Accumulation of sand is derived from the depression (Cholnoky 1902). The blowout dune is the circular rim of the aeolian depression. It may extend downwind and may form a parabolic dune when stabilized by vegetation on Earth.

Morphometry

Blowout dunes typically have a high ratio of depositional lobe length and deflation basin length. Hollow width is frequently correlated with the depositional lobe length (trough blowouts have a ratio of 1:4, saucer...

Keywords

Wind Erosion Leeward Slope Water Table Position Basin Length Sand Supply 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Coast, Water and Surface Processes Research GroupUniversidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, Instituo Dom LuizLisbonPortugal
  2. 2.Planetary Science Research GroupEötvös Loránd University, Institute of Geography and Earth SciencesBudapestHungary