Encyclopedia of Medical Immunology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Ian R. Mackay, Noel R. Rose, Dennis K. Ledford, Richard F. Lockey

Textile Allergy

  • Alexandra Gómez García
  • Fernando Rodríguez Fernández
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9194-1_582

Synonyms

Allergic contact dermatitis due to textile fibers; Clothing allergy; Textile contact dermatitis

Definition

Textile allergy or textile contact dermatitis can be defined as cutaneous manifestations caused by wearing clothing.

Introduction

The manifestation of textile allergy is usually located in the skin. For that reason, it is also known as textile contact dermatitis. The etiological agents may be the fabric itself or more commonly the chemical additives used in manufacturing the clothes, e.g., textile dyes and finishing agents.

Historical Background

The first case of textile contact dermatitis was probably recognized by a group of dermatologists in the British Army, during the Second World War, who found a number of cases in some of the troops of the British Army because of wearing khaki shirts. Skin lesions such as papular, scaly, erythrodermic, and even purpuric ones were described and it was concluded that those were due to a primary irritant quality in new khaki shirts....

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandra Gómez García
    • 1
  • Fernando Rodríguez Fernández
    • 1
  1. 1.Servicio de AlergologíaHospital Universitario Marqués de ValdecillaSantanderSpain