Encyclopedia of Law and Economics

Living Edition
| Editors: Alain Marciano, Giovanni Battista Ramello

Mercantilism

  • Günther Chaloupek
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7883-6_319-1

Definition

Mercantilism is a system of economic policy and a corpus of economic doctrines which developed side by side from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. The main goal was to increase a nation’s wealth and power by imposing government regulation to promote the nation’s commercial interests by maximizing exports and limiting imports.

Mercantilism, Colbertism, Cameralism

Mercantilismis a system of economic policy and a corpus of economic doctrines which developed side by side from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. As a theory, mercantilism marks the decisive step in the emancipation of thinking about economic phenomena from scholastic theology to political economy and economics as a social science of its own. With respect to economic policy, mercantilism took a variety of different forms according to the different political, economic, and social conditions prevailing in European states during the early modern period. As a consequence, there are national variants of...

Keywords

Eighteenth Century Export Promotion Early Modern Period External Balance Export Surplus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Heckscher EF (1935) Mercantilism. Allen & Unwin, LondonGoogle Scholar
  2. Pribram K (1983) A history of economic reasoning. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore/LondonGoogle Scholar
  3. Roll E (1942) A history of economic thought. Prentice-Hall, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Schmoller G (1883) Das Merkantilsystem in seiner historischen Bedeutung. In: Jahrbuch für Gesetzgebung, Verwaltung und Volkswirtschaft, vol VIIIGoogle Scholar
  5. Schumpeter JA (1954) History of economic analysis. Allen & Unwin, LondonGoogle Scholar
  6. Sommer L (1920/1925) Die österreichischen Kameralisten in dogmengeschichtlicher Darstellung, Heft XI und XII der Studien zur Sozial-, Wirtschafts- und Verwaltungsgeschichte, Carl Grünberg C (ed), Vienna, reprint Scientia Verlag, Aalen 1967Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Austrian Chamber of LabourViennaAustria