Surgical Technique: Open Hip Dislocation, Open Reduction, and Internal Fixation

Living reference work entry

Abstract

Femoral head fractures are high-energy injuries, often associated with posterior hip dislocations. Outcomes from these injuries, irrespective of treatment modality, have historically been very poor, with high reported rates of posttraumatic arthritis, avascular necrosis (AVN), and heterotopic ossification. Much controversy remains as to the best treatment algorithm for femoral head fractures and femoral head fracture-dislocations, including the optimal surgical approach. This review highlights two described techniques of surgical dislocation: digastric (trochanteric flip) osteotomy and modified Smith-Petersen. Surgical dislocation of the hip provides significant advantages over traditional approaches, including complete visualization of the femoral head for fracture reduction and fixation, access to the joint for debridement, and access to the acetabulum for fixation of associated injuries.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Orthopaedic Trauma and Fracture Service, Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Hospital of the University of PennsylvaniaOrthopaedic Surgery, Penn OrthopaedicsPhiladelphiaUSA

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