Encyclopedia of Computational Neuroscience

Living Edition
| Editors: Dieter Jaeger, Ranu Jung

Methodologies for the Treatment of Pain

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7320-6_599-3

Synonyms

Definition

Invasive techniques to interface with the spinal cord are often selected for patients suffering pain conditions that are refractory to conventional medical management. These spinal interfaces for the treatment of pain can include epidural electrical stimulation and intrathecal drug delivery.

Detailed Description

Introduction

A significant number of patients suffering chronic pain do not respond well to standard pharmacological therapies. For these patients, more invasive therapies are often considered. One standard therapy is electrical stimulation of the spinal cord with electrode arrays implanted in the epidural space dorsal to the spinal cord. Another common treatment option is the delivery of analgesics by insertion of a catheter system inside the intrathecal space of the spine. Due to the invasive nature of these therapies, they are typically selected as a last resort for pain management.

Keywords

Migration Catheter 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Neurological RestorationCleveland ClinicClevelandUSA