Encyclopedia of Social Network Analysis and Mining

Editors: Reda Alhajj, Jon Rokne

The Nature of Social Structures

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7163-9_110180-1

Synonyms

Glossary

Pragmatics

A subfield of linguistics that studies the way in which context contributes to meaning. It is also concerned with the factors that govern our choice of language in social interaction and with the effect of these choices on others. Pragmatics is needed to reach a deeper and more reasonable understanding of human language and, in turn, to grasp the fundamental rules governing social interactions.

Social exchange

The process of transferring nonmaterial resources (e.g., knowledge, affection) between people during social interaction. Individuals contribute to and derive benefits from social structures by means of those exchanges.

Social group

A social aggregation of multiple actors who share a common trait, purpose, or identity and who usually interact with one another. Groups vary greatly in size and type: a small family, a community of fans, or a whole ethnicity can all be considered groups. The boundaries of a group...

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Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Bogdan State, Rossano Schifanella, Przemyslaw Grabowicz, David Martin-Borregón, Victor Eguiluz, Alejandro Jaimes, and Ricardo Baeza-Yates for the research work they have conducted jointly with the author and parts of which are summarized in this entry.

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Recommended Reading

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nokia Bell LabsCambridgeUK