Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Living Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Reactive Attachment Disorder

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6435-8_603-3

Synonyms

Short Description or Definition

Children with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) or disinhibited social engagement disorder (DSED) exhibit abnormal social and attachment-related behaviors before the age of 5 years. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), and the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10), these are stress-related disorders, and the symptoms occur in consequence, i.e., following, or in reaction to, pathogenic caretaking of the child in the early years of life.

In the DSM-IV, the RAD diagnosis included two subtypes, characterized by different behavioral patterns. In the inhibited or withdrawn type, children avoid comfort, seem afraid to seek it, do not respond to it, and even resent comfort offered to them by caregivers. Failure to develop attachments to any caregivers is the essence of this disorder. In the disinhibited or indiscriminate type,...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael