Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Living Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Sensory Processing Measure: Preschool (SPM-P)

  • Ted Brown
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6435-8_1900-3

Synonyms

Description

The Sensory Processing Measure – Preschool (SPM-P) (Glennon et al. 2011; Miller Kuhaneck et al. 2010a, 2010b) is a set of scales that allows the assessment of praxis, social participation, and sensory processing issues present in preschool-age children (2–5 years of age). The SPM-P consists of the Home Form (Ecker and Parham 2010) and the School Form (Miller Kuhaneck et al. 2010) that are published Western Psychological Services (www.wpspublish.com). The SPM-P is a companion instrument to the Sensory Processing Measure (SPM) (Parham et al. 2007) that is designed for use with children ages 5–12 years. The SPM-P has the same theoretical basis and subscale structure as the SPM. “These commonalities facilitate a seamless transition between the two assessments for children who need to be followed over the longer term” (Miller Kuhaneck et al. 2010, p. 3). It should be noted that the...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health SciencesMonash University – Peninsula CampusFrankstonAustralia