Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Living Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Response Interruption/Redirection

  • Bill Ahearn
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6435-8_1296-3

Definition

Response interruption and redirection (RIRD) is an applied behavior analytic procedure commonly implemented to treat stereotypic behavior and other responses thought to be maintained by the sensory consequences of the response (i.e., automatic reinforcement; see Rapp & Vollmer, 2005). RIRD entails interrupting each instance of the target behavior and redirecting to an appropriate response (Ahearn et al. 2007). For example, if a child emits stereotypic vocalizations, then a caregiver asks the child social questions (e.g., “what’s your name?” “where do you live?” “what’s your brother’s name?”) they have readily answered in the past. Once the child answers the questions in the absence of stereotypic vocalizations, the caregiver provides brief praise and ceases asking the child social questions. RIRD and a related procedure, response blocking, has produced significant change for both motoric and vocal stereotypic responses as well as with self-injurious behavior. However, it is...

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References and Reading

  1. Ahearn, W. H., Clark, K. M., MacDonald, R. P. F., & Chung, B. I. (2007). Assessing and treating vocal stereotypy in children with autism. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 40, 263–275.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  2. Ahrens, E. N., Lerman, D. C., Kodak, T., Worsdell, A. S., & Keegan, C. (2011). Further evaluation of response interruption and redirection as treatment for stereotypy. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 95–108.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Colón, C. L. & Ahearn, W. H. (in press). An analysis of treatment integrity of response interruption and redirection. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Google Scholar
  4. Colón, C. L., Ahearn, W. H., Clark, K. M., & Masalsky, J. (2012). The effects of verbal operant training and response interruption and redirection on appropriate and inappropriate vocalizations. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 45, 107–120.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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  7. Martinez, C. K., & Betz, A. M. (2013). Response interruption and redirection: Current research trends and clinical application. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 46, 549–554.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Miguel, C. F., Clark, K., Tereshko, L., & Ahearn, W. H. (2009). The effects of response interruption and redirection and sertraline on vocal stereotypy. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42, 883–888.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  9. Rapp, J. T., & Vollmer, T. R. (2005). Stereotypy I: A review of behavioral assessment and treatment. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 26, 527–547.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Vanderkerken, L., Heyvaert, M., Maes, B., & Onghena, P. (2013). Psychosocial interventions for reducing vocal challenging behavior in persons with autistic disorder: A multilevel meta-analysis of single-case experiments. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34, 4515–4533.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The New England Center for ChildrenSouthboroughUSA