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Lethal Multiple Pterygium Syndrome

  • Harold Chen
Living reference work entry

Abstract

Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome (LMPS) is a lethal hereditary disorder characterized by a distinct constellation of multiple anomalies, consisting of multiple pterygia, flexion contractures of multiple joints, characteristic facial appearance, cystic hygroma, hydrops, and pulmonary and cardiac hypoplasia.

Keywords

Pulmonary Hypoplasia Bony Fusion Cystic Hygroma Facial Anomaly Hypoplastic Lung 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Medical GeneticsShriners Hospitals for ChildrenShreveportUSA
  2. 2.Perinatal and Clinical Genetics, Department of PediatricsLSU Health Sciences CenterShreveportUSA

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