Encyclopedia of Metagenomics

Living Edition
| Editors: Karen E. Nelson

Salt Lakes, Metagenomics of

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6418-1_42-6

Synonyms

Definition

The largest and best known natural hypersaline lakes are the Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA) and the Dead Sea on the border between Israel and Jordan. The first has an ionic composition that resembles that of seawater, and the second is dominated by divalent cations (Mg2+, Ca2+) rather than by Na+. The north arm of the Great Salt Lake is currently saturated with NaCl, and its brines are colored red by dense communities of halophilic Archaea (Halobacteriaceae), while the southern part is less saline, and its prokaryotic communities are dominated by Bacteria. Conditions in the Dead Sea are currently too extreme to support extensive microbial growth. Only after extremely rainy winters are blooms of algae (Dunaliella) and red Archaea observed. Metagenomic studies in the Great Salt Lake and in the Dead Sea now enable a comparison of the biota inhabiting these two disparate hypersaline water bodies.

Introduction

Hypersaline, salt-saturated brines in lakes,...

Keywords

Biomass Bacillus Carotenoid HCO3 Egypt 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Plant and Environmental SciencesThe Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life SciencesJerusalemIsrael