Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Fox, Matthew

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_9004

Matthew Fox (b.1940) is a preeminent creative American spiritual theologian who cuts a bold swath through thickets of rigid religious opposition to create “Creation Spirituality.” He is a leader and shaker in awakening Christianity to a renewed ecumenical spirituality that puts human beings in touch with their deepest cosmic souls, free of stifling religious traditions, patriarchal domination, and mechanistic industrialism and open to the wonders of creation. He was influenced by Leo Tolstoy, Thomas Merton, Teilhard de Chardin, and others; he studied at the Dominican Aquinas Institute of Theology, then the Institut Catholique de Paris (1967–1970) (Fox 1996).

To Fox, the mystics resonate with his own insights. In Thomas Aquinas, Fox found support for his creation-centered theology. In Meister Eckhart and Teilhard de Chardin, Fox found a mystical connection with nature and science. In Hildegard of Bingen, Fox found feminism, music, art, healing, ecological spirituality, and courage to...

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Bibliography

  1. Creation Spirituality Communities. (2012). Retrieved from http://originalblessing.ning.com. Accessed 23 March 2012.
  2. Fox, M. (1983/2000).Original blessing: A primer in creation spirituality. New York: Tarcher-Putnam’s.Google Scholar
  3. Fox, M. (1988). The coming of the cosmic Christ. San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco.Google Scholar
  4. Fox, M. (1991). Creation spirituality: Liberating gifts for the peoples of the earth. New York: HarperCollins.Google Scholar
  5. Fox, M. (1993). The reinvention of work: A new vision of livelihood for our time. New York: HarperCollins.Google Scholar
  6. Fox, M. (1995). Wrestling with the prophets: Essays on creation spirituality and everyday life. San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco.Google Scholar
  7. Fox, M. (1996). Confessions: The making of a post-denominational priest. San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco.Google Scholar
  8. Fox, M. (2000a). One river, many wells: Wisdom springing from global faiths. New York: Tarcher/Putnam’s.Google Scholar
  9. Fox, M. (2000b). Passion for creation: The earth-honoring spirituality of Meister Eckhart. Garden City: Doubleday.Google Scholar
  10. Fox, M. (2002). Creativity: Where the divine and the human meet. New York: Tarcher.Google Scholar
  11. Fox, M. (2006a). The A.W.E. project: Reinventing education, reinventing the human. Kelowna: Copper House.Google Scholar
  12. Fox, M. (2006b). A new reformation: Creation spirituality and the transformation of Christianity. Rochester: Inner Traditions.Google Scholar
  13. Fox, M. (2008). The hidden spirituality of men: Ten metaphors to awaken the sacred masculine. Novato: New World Library.Google Scholar
  14. Fox, M. (2011). The Pope’s war: Why Ratzinger’s secret crusade has imperiled the church and how it can be saved. New York: Sterling.Google Scholar
  15. Fox, M. (2012). http://www.matthewfox.org. Accessed 23 March 2012.
  16. Fox, M., & Sheldrake, R. (1996). Natural grace: Dialogues on creation, darkness, and the soul in spirituality and science. Garden City: Doubleday.Google Scholar
  17. Hildegard of Bingen (1987). Hildegard of Bingens book of divine works, songs & letters (M. Fox, Ed.) Rochester: Bear & Co.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of St. ScholasticaDuluthUSA