Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Freud, Sigmund

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_252

Sigmund Freud (1856–1939) is most often mentioned today in relation to psychology and psychiatry, but he had little no training in these fields. In reality he was a well-respected neurologist who developed an approach to human behavior known as psychoanalysis. Freud was a man of enormous learning and huge capacities and talents. His writings, which fill up about 30 volumes, cover all aspects of human experience, culture, and history.

The creation of psychoanalysis offered at once a theory of the human psyche, a proposed treatment system for the relief of its ills, and a method for the interpretation of culture and society. Despite repeated criticisms and rejections of Freud’s work, its influence remained powerful well after his death and in some fields far removed from psychology as it is narrowly defined.

Freud was trained as a physician and was drawn to neurology and psychiatry, but he was always more interested in theory than in practice. After starting his work with neurotic...

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Bibliography

  1. Ellenberger, H. F. (1970). The discovery of the unconscious: The history and evolution of dynamic psychiatry. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  2. Freud, S. (1955a). Group psychology and the analysis of the ego. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (pp. 65–143). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  3. Freud, S. (1955b). Totem and taboo. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (pp. 1–164). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  4. Freud, S. (1957). Thoughts for the time on war and death. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (pp. 273–300). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  5. Freud, S. (1961a). Civilization and its discontents. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (pp. 57–146). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  6. Freud, S. (1961b). The future of an illusion. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (pp. 1–56). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HaifaHaifaIsrael