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US National Crime Victimization Survey

Synonyms

National Crime Survey; NCVS

Overview

The importance of the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and its predecessor the National Crime Survey (NCS) to the study of crime and development of crime statistics cannot be emphasized enough. For over 40 years, the NCS-NCVS has been one of only two ongoing national measures of crime in the United States that provide annual level and change estimates. The NCS-NCVS not only has played a groundbreaking role in shaping US crime statistics, but also international ones. This entry discusses the rich history of the NCS-NCVS with a focus on its methodological development. This entry also describes the survey’s trends and key findings over time and the continued influence of the NCS-NCVS on crime measurement.

Introduction

The importance of the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and its predecessor the National Crime Survey (NCS) on the study of crime and development of crime statistics cannot be emphasized enough. The NCS-NCVS is...

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Correspondence to Lynn A. Addington .

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Addington, L.A., Rennison, C.M. (2014). US National Crime Victimization Survey. In: Bruinsma, G., Weisburd, D. (eds) Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_448

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