Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice

2014 Edition
| Editors: Gerben Bruinsma, David Weisburd

National Victimization Surveys

  • Marcelo F. Aebi
  • Antonia Linde
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_445

Overview

The aim of this entry is to trace the development and the expansion of general victimization surveys across the world. The description focuses on national general victimization surveys, although references to international surveys cannot be avoided because many countries use the International Crime Victims Survey (ICVS) as their national measure of victimization. Specific surveys, such as those focused on businesses, domestic violence, or minority victimizations, are excluded. The entry begins with a historical note, continues with a description of the main surveys already carried out – and those currently conducted periodically – across the five continents, and concludes with a summary of the main findings and a brief mention of known methodological issues in comparative cross-national research based on national victimization surveys.

Historical Development of Crime Victim Surveys

In 1730, following a series of citizens’ complaints about an increase of property offences, the...

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Recommended Reading and References

  1. Aebi MF, Linde A (2010) A review of victimisation surveys in Europe from 1970 to 2010. In: van Dijk J, Mayhew P, van Kesteren J, Aebi MF, Linde A (eds) Final report on the study on crime victimisation. Intervict/PrismaPrint Tilburg, Tilburg, pp D1–D76Google Scholar
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  24. van Dijk JJM, Mayhew P, van Kesteren J, Aebi MF, Linde A (2010) Final report on the study on crime victimisation. Intervict/PrismaPrint Tilburg, TilburgGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Criminal Sciences, Institute of Criminology and Criminal LawUniversity of LausanneLausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Open University of CataloniaBarcelonaSpain