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Order Maintenance Policing

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Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice

Synonyms

“Broken windows” policing; Quality-of-life policing

Overview

Order maintenance policing is a police practice that involves managing minor offenses and neighborhood disorders in order to address community problems. Order maintenance policing is influenced by the “broken windows” hypothesis, which describes the process by which minor offenses can lead to citizen fear and the decline of neighborhoods. Order maintenance policing has been credited with crime reduction in cities across the United States, most notably in New York City during the 1990s.

Definition of Order Maintenance Policing

That officers should help to maintain order in communities has always been an expected and desired function of modern police. In the contemporary sense, order maintenance policing (also called “broken windows” policing or “quality-of-life” policing) refers to a police operational tactic that involves managing minor offenses and acts of physical and social disorder. Order maintenance is generally...

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Correspondence to William Sousa .

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Sousa, W., Kelling, G. (2014). Order Maintenance Policing. In: Bruinsma, G., Weisburd, D. (eds) Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_267

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_267

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

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