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Effective Supervision Principles for Probation and Parole

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Overview

The content of parole and probation supervision, particularly in the United States, underwent an emphatic shift toward a focus on monitoring and surveillance starting in the mid-1970s. More recently, the field had focused increasingly on implementing supervision practices based on emerging evidence-based practices and the risk-need-responsivity model for changing offender behavior. However, changing everyday supervision practice to accommodate this emerging knowledge remains a challenge. Frameworks to translate this focus into concrete principles to guide the delivery of supervision have been created, but efforts to devise and test implementation models based on those principles are still in the early stages. Substantial questions remain about how to most effectively implement state of the art supervision practices at the agency level, what dosage and intensity of supervision is appropriate and effective for what types of supervisees, and what the effects will be of...

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_24
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Correspondence to Jesse Jannetta .

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Jannetta, J., Burrell, W.D. (2014). Effective Supervision Principles for Probation and Parole. In: Bruinsma, G., Weisburd, D. (eds) Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_24

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