Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice

2014 Edition
| Editors: Gerben Bruinsma, David Weisburd

Impacts of Community-Oriented Policing

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_198

Introduction: The Deficit of Traditional Policing

The academic evaluative literature on police during the 1970s and 1980s concluded in an impressive consensus concerning the deficit of traditional police models (Bayley 1994; 1998). Summarized, following critiques can be considered as the most important: (1) The mere increase of the number of police officers is not an effective strategy to tackle crime or disorderly behavior. The quantitative assumption cannot resolve the necessary qualitative change of “how to do good policing” (Greene 1998). (2) The police cannot prevent crime, and more generally, cannot function without the help of the population, which means that the population is much more than “the eyes and ears” of the police (Rosenbaum 1998). (3) The classic tactics of traditional police models are too reactive, while they do not affect the circumstances that cause crime and disorder. (4) Police policy is frequently too broad and is applied to different problems in one and the...

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Recommended Reading and References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Law, Research Group SVAGhent UniversityGhentBelgium