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Understanding Victimization Frequency

Synonyms

Victimization incidence; Victimization rate

Overview

In the past two decades, the central place of repeat and multiple crime incidents against the same victims in boosting crime rates, predicting vulnerability to victimization and, with that knowledge, assisting crime prevention, has been recognized. This entry overviews the accumulated evidence on measuring and predicting victimization frequency and hints at possible crime prevention implications. It concludes with a list for future improvements in measuring and thus understanding repeat victimization.

Context

The field of criminology has traditionally focused on the offenders, the origins of offending behavior, and how to contain or ultimately eliminate it. The Chicago School of the inter-world war period broke away from that tradition by examining the societal (demographic, social, and economic) conditions that were associated with crime concentration. In doing so, researchers, such as Shaw and McKay (1942), introduced...

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Correspondence to Andromachi Tseloni .

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Tseloni, A. (2014). Understanding Victimization Frequency. In: Bruinsma, G., Weisburd, D. (eds) Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_127

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