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Socialism, Overview

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Introduction

Socialism is a concept which is often the subject of polemical discussions. Like other concepts, ideology and alienation, it has been influenced by Marxist thought. Developments within and difficulties with different types of Marxism have left their mark on discussions concerning socialism. However, it is important to note that the concept of socialism precedes Marx and is a much broader concept than Marxism.

Every concept develops historically. This is especially important when a concept directly tackles practical matters. Because of that, the approach adopted here is a historical one. The historical development of socialist movements will be highlighted in order to show the development of socialist ideas. Just after that it will be possible to raise debates about psychology and socialism.

Definition

The broadest definition of socialism presents it as a theoretical-political doctrine which guides and lies behind organized social movements. In this sense, it is a...

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Correspondence to Fernando Lacerda Jr. .

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Lacerda, F. (2014). Socialism, Overview. In: Teo, T. (eds) Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5583-7_642

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