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Socialization

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Introduction

Socialization refers to the developmental processes through which individuals acquire the values, behaviors, and motivations necessary to become competent members of a culture. Postulated in this form in the mid-twentieth century, socialization remains a central concept in psychology. As a theoretical entity, it has been the subject of extensive empirical examination and debate. It is a normative concept that distinguishes between normal and non-normal ways of being in the social world. As a normative as well as broad conceptual category, socialization has entered into lay discourse and is regularly applied to explain and manage practical affairs; it has been influential in education, parenting, and political affairs. Socialization has been advanced to explain a plethora of psychological matters, including race relations, gender roles, moral decision-making, citizenship, self-control, affect management, and self concept, among others. While it once had a distinctly...

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Correspondence to Jill Morawski .

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Morawski, J. (2014). Socialization. In: Teo, T. (eds) Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5583-7_295

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