Encyclopedia of Creativity, Invention, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

2013 Edition
| Editors: Elias G. Carayannis

China’s National Innovation System

  • Hefa SONG
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3858-8_497

Synonyms

Introduction

Innovation capacity is one of the fundamental sources of nation’s wealth (Antonelli, 2006). China has made great progress in all fields since the reform and opening-up, especially the accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO). The economy has developed rapidly and GDP per capita increased to more than 5,000 US dollars. The scientific and technological innovation capacity is ranked 30th in the world. Science, technology (briefly, S&T), and innovation now play an increasingly important role in economic and social development. Their supporting and leading roles in sustainable economic and social development are becoming increasingly essential. China has set forward the ambitious objective to be an innovative country in 2020. China’s national innovation system still has many deficiencies and problems to overcome, however, before reaching that goal.

China is the largest developing country in terms of economy and also the largest...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Policy and ManagementChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina