Encyclopedia of Creativity, Invention, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

2013 Edition
| Editors: Elias G. Carayannis

Quality Assurance and Quality Enhancement in Higher Education and Innovation

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3858-8_326

Synonyms

Difficulties in Defining “Quality” Within Higher Education

This entry gives an overview of the intersection of quality assurance/quality enhancement within the sector of higher education and innovation. When focusing their function of creating knowledge, the institutions of higher education themselves can be taken as examples for organizations oriented toward innovation. Furthermore, measures of quality assurance and/or quality enhancement are – or at least should be – devised in a way that they foster continuous innovation of the organizations (by means of learning and improvement). This can be seen as a process of change management within institutions often appearing strongly stratified and where the complex interaction of external (e.g., stately) regulations and powerful internal resistance (e.g., of traditional academic demeanor) must be taken into account.

The distinction of “quality assurance” and “quality...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Zentrum fuer Hochschul- und Qualitaetsentwicklung (ZfH)Universitaet Duisburg-EssenDuisburgGermany