Encyclopedia of Planetary Landforms

2015 Edition
| Editors: Henrik Hargitai, Ákos Kereszturi

Subglacial Volcano

  • John L. Smellie
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3134-3_551

Definition

A volcanic edifice constructed in whole or in part by eruption beneath ice. Although eruptions occur subglacially initially, many subglacial volcanoes culminate subaerially, having melted their way completely through the overlying ice. A subglacial volcano is thus often constructed in two distinctive parts: a basal part formed subglacially or englacially and owing its major features to the presence of ice and/or meltwater and a subaerial superstructure that may be indistinguishable from volcanoes formed in an entirely ice-free setting (e.g.,  shield volcano).

Synonyms

Note on Terminology

Móbergis an Icelandic word for a ridge-like volcanic feature formed principally of mafic tephra (lapilli tuffs) erupted explosively from a fissure that may or may not overlie pillow lava and hyaloclastite formed in initial eruptions. Its use is somewhat parochial (Iceland specific) and should be discontinued...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeologyUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK