Computational Complexity

2012 Edition
| Editors: Robert A. Meyers (Editor-in-Chief)

Social Network Analysis, Overview of

  • John Scott
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1800-9_178

Article Outline

Glossary

Definition of the Subject

The Development of Social Network Analysis

Graph Theory and Ideas of Balance

Diffusion Processes

Algebraic Models and Blockmodeling

Scaling models and Visualization

Statistical Models for Hypothesis Testing

Agent-Based Computational Models and Temporal Processes

Small World Models and Network Dynamics

Bibliography

Keywords

Social Network Graph Theory Random Graph Social Network Analysis Small World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Scott
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Law and Social ScienceUniversity of PlymouthPlymouthUK