Computational Complexity

2012 Edition
| Editors: Robert A. Meyers (Editor-in-Chief)

Mobile Agents

  • Niranjan Suri
  • Jan Vitek
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1800-9_122

Article Outline

Definition of the Subject

Introduction

Classification of Mobile Agent Capabilities

Theoretical Foundations of Mobility

Requirements Addressed by Mobile Agents

Components of a Mobile Agent System

Security

Survey of Mobile Agent Systems

Application Areas

Future Directions

Acknowledgments

Bibliography

Keywords

Migration Filter Agent Assure Arena Encapsulation 
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Notes

Acknowledgments

Portions of this chapter were initially written for the Information Technology Assessment Consortium(ITAC) at the Institute for Human & Machine Cognition (IHMC) as part of a report entitled Software Agents for the Warfighter, sponsored by NASAand DARPA, and edited by Jeffrey Bradshaw at IHMC.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Niranjan Suri
    • 1
  • Jan Vitek
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Human and Machine CognitionPensacolaUSA
  2. 2.Purdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA