Encyclopedia of Metalloproteins

2013 Edition
| Editors: Robert H. Kretsinger, Vladimir N. Uversky, Eugene A. Permyakov

Silver, Physical and Chemical Properties

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1533-6_539

Silver occurs in native state and therefore has been known since ancient times. In the second millennium BC, the Phœnicians obtained large quantities of silver from deposits on the Iberian Peninsula. The first large-scale production of silver took place when the Greeks exploited the mines of Laurion, which reached their peak productivity in ca. 500 BC. The Greeks also worked silver mines in Thrace and in Asia Minor. The Greek Empire was based to a large extent on the role of silver for coinage.

Physical Properties

Atomic number

47

Atomic weight

107.87

Relative abundance in earth’s crust, %

2 × 10−6

Naturally occurring isotopes

107Ag (51.8%)

109Ag (48.2%).

Crystal structure

Face-centered cubic

Lattice constant at 20°C, nm

0.40774

Atomic radius (12- coordination), nm

0.144

Ionic radius of Ag+ (6-coordination), nm

0.137

Density, g/cm3

 

  At 20°C

10.49

  Of liquid at melting point

9.30

  Of liquid at 1,250°C

9.05

Melting point, °C

961.9

Boiling point, °C

2,210

Vapor pressure, Pa

 

  At...

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References

  1. Renner H (1997) Silver. In: Habashi F (ed) Handbook of extractive metallurgy. WILEY-VCH, Weinheim, pp 1215–1268Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Materials EngineeringLaval UniversityQuebec CityCanada