Encyclopedia of Metalloproteins

2013 Edition
| Editors: Robert H. Kretsinger, Vladimir N. Uversky, Eugene A. Permyakov

Selenoprotein Sep15

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1533-6_500

Synonyms

Definition

The 15 kDa selenocysteine-containing protein (selenoprotein) “Sep15” belongs to the family of oxidoreductases and has been shown to be involved in quality control of folding of proteins and in cataract formation (Kasaikina et al. 2011). It is a homologue of selenoprotein M (SelM), which is also a selenocysteine-containing protein with redox activity, thought to be involved in the antioxidant response (Ferguson et al. 2006). The biological function of Sep15 is not completely understood, and it appears to have a strong tissue specificity and split personality in terms of cancer initiation and promotion. Thus, among the many selenoproteins, Sep15 continues to generate interest due to its potential implications in health and disease.

Sep15 and Selenium

The expression of Sep15, like many other selenoproteins, is regulated by the selenium status of the organism (Ferguson et al. 2006). Whereas the expression of essential,...

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Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Drs. Vadim Gladyshev and Dolph Hatfield for their support and critical review.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesTowson UniversityTowsonUSA
  2. 2.Molecular Biology of Selenium Section, Laboratory of Cancer PreventionNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA