Encyclopedia of Metalloproteins

2013 Edition
| Editors: Robert H. Kretsinger, Vladimir N. Uversky, Eugene A. Permyakov

Aluminum, Physical and Chemical Properties

  • Fathi HabashiEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1533-6_412

Aluminum is the most abundant metallic element in the earth’s crust. It occurs in a variety of minerals combined with oxygen, silicon, the alkali and alkaline-earth metals, and fluorine, and as hydroxides, sulfates, and phosphates. Many applications of aluminum are based upon its low density, high electrical and thermal conductivities, and resistance to corrosion. Pure aluminum is soft but it can be alloyed with other elements to increase strength and impart a number of useful properties.

Physical Properties

Atomic number

13

Atomic weight

26.98

Relative abundance,%

8.13

Melting point, °C

660.5

Boiling point, °C

2,494

Heat of fusion, J/g

397

Heat of vaporization, kJ/g

10.8

Heat capacity, J g−1 K−1

0.90

Density, g/cm3

2.699

Density of liquid, g/cm3

  at 700°C

  at 900°C

2.357

2.304

Crystal structure

Face-centered cubic

Atomic diameter, m

2.86 × 10−10

Lattice constant (length of unit cube) at 25°C, m

4.0496 × 10−10

Coefficient of expansion at 20°C, K−1

23 × 10−6

Thermal conductivity at...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Frank WB et al (1997) Aluminum. In: Habashi F (ed) Handbook of extractive metallurgy. Wiley, Weinheim, pp 1093–1127Google Scholar
  2. Habashi F (1994) Aluminum and its position in the periodic table. Educ Chem (Bombay) 11(2):18–24. http://www.meta-ynthesis.com/webbook/35_pt/pt.html#hab

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Materials EngineeringLaval UniversityQuebec CityCanada