Encyclopedia of Metalloproteins

2013 Edition
| Editors: Robert H. Kretsinger, Vladimir N. Uversky, Eugene A. Permyakov

Copper, Physical and Chemical Properties

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1533-6_337

Copper is an ancient metal has a characteristic red color, was used to make statues and coins, later mixed with tin to make bronze and with zinc to make brass. Bronze was cast in statues, bells, cannons, and other objects. Brass was an alloy that looked like gold. Copper occurs in nature in the metallic state in certain locations such as in Lake Superior region but mostly as sulfide and to a minor extent as oxide and silicate. Some of its minerals when pure have beautiful blue color and are used as gem stones.

Physical Properties

Atomic number

29

Atomic weight

63.55

Density, g/cm3

8.89

Melting point, °C

1,083

Boiling point, °C

2,595

Heat of fusion, J/g

210

Heat of vaporization, J/g

4,810

Vapor pressure at m.p., Pa

0.073

Specific heat capacity, J g−1 K−1

 

At 20°C and 100 kPa

0.385

At 957°C and 100 kPa

0.494

Average specific heat, J g−1 K−1

 

  0–300°C at 100 kPa

0.411

  0–1,000°C at 100 kPa

0.437

Coefficient of linear thermal expansion, K−1

 

  0–100°C

16.9 × 10−6

  0–400°C

17.9 × 10−6

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References

  1. Fabian H (1997) In: Habashi F (ed) Handbook of extractive metallurgy. Wiley-VCH, Heidelberg, Chapter 8Google Scholar
  2. Habashi F (1999) Textbook of hydrometallurgy, 2nd edn. Métallurgie Extractive Québec, Laval University Bookstore, Québec CityGoogle Scholar
  3. Habashi F (2002) Textbook of pyrometallurgy. Métallurgie Extractive Québec, Laval University Bookstore, Québec CityGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Materials EngineeringLaval UniversityQuebec CityCanada