Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers

2014 Edition
| Editors: Thomas Hockey, Virginia Trimble, Thomas R. Williams, Katherine Bracher, Richard A. Jarrell, Jordan D. MarchéII, JoAnn Palmeri, Daniel W. E. Green

John of Sicily

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-9917-7_9305

Alternate Names

 Johannes de Messina;  Johannes de Sicilia;  Johannes Siculus;  John of Messina;  Juan de Messina

FlourishedParis, France, end of thirteenth century

John of Sicily was the author of a commentary on one of the canons to the Toledan Tables. Nothing is known of his life except that he was in Paris at the end of the thirteenth century. His only extant work is the commentary Inter cetera veritatis philosophicae documenta on the canons Quoniam cuiusque actionis to the Toledan Tables. The commentary is dated circa 1291; it is very literal and very elaborate. It can be considered a good example of a standard text on medieval trigonometry and planetary theory. Like the canons, the commentary can be divided in three parts. The first one is dedicated to the division of time and the conversion from different calendars. The application of trigonometry to the astronomy of the primum mobileconstitutes the second part, while the third is dedicated to the motion of the planets. The...

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Selected Reference

  1. Pedersen, Fritz Saaby (1986). “Scriptum Johannis de Sicilia super canones Azarchelis de tabulis Toletanis” Copenhagen, Cahiers de l’Institut du Moyen-Âge grec et latin vols. 51–52.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MilanItaly