Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers

2014 Edition
| Editors: Thomas Hockey, Virginia Trimble, Thomas R. Williams, Katherine Bracher, Richard A. Jarrell, Jordan D. MarchéII, JoAnn Palmeri, Daniel W. E. Green

Daśabala

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-9917-7_336

Flourished (Rajasthan, India), 1055–1058

Daśabala, who styled himself as a Bodhisattva, was a Buddhist astronomer who flourished in the eleventh century. From statements made by him in his works, we learn that he was the son of Virocana of the Kāyastha class and of the Valabha clan. He eulogized King Bhoja of the Paramāra dynasty of Rajasthan who was a major patron of contemporary scholars.

Daśabala was the author of two works: the Cintāmaṇisāraṇikā(1055) and a larger treatise, the Karaṇakamalamārtaṇḍa(1058). These reveal Daśabala to be a follower of the Brāhma School, one of four principal schools of Hindu astronomy during the classical period (late fifth to twelfth centuries). Both texts proved extremely useful for making astronomical computations and were couched in verse form for easy memorization of the rules.

The Cintāmaṇisāraṇikāis divided into six sections, and formulates tables for the daily correction of positions of the Sun and Moon, for the equation of time, and for other calendrical functions.

The Karaṇakamalamārtaṇḍais a comprehensive treatise that describes all of the principal aspects of astronomy. It consists of 10 sections relating chiefly to the calculation of planetary positions, lunar and solar eclipses, the lunar crescent, and planetary conjunctions, along with an enumeration of the 60-year cycle of Jupiter. In short, this work provides all necessary information on standard computations performed in Indian astronomy.

Selected References

  1. Chattopadhyay, Anjana (2002). “Daśabala.” In Biographical Dictionary of Indian Scientists: From Ancient to Contemporary, p. 344. New Delhi: Rupa.Google Scholar
  2. Pingree, David (1971). “Daśabala.” In Dictionary of Scientific Biography, edited by Charles Coulston Gillispie. Vol. 3, p. 584. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.Google Scholar
  3. — (1978). “History of Mathematical Astronomy in India.” In Dictionary of Scientific Biography, edited by Charles Coulston Gillispie. Vol. 15 (Suppl. 1), pp. 533–633. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.Google Scholar
  4. — (1988). The Astronomical Works of Daśabala. Aligarh: Viveka Publications.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SSES Research CentreChennaiIndia